RobertBailey UC Berkeley
Robert Bailey UC Berkeley

The Value of Record-Keeping in Education Explained by Robert Bailey of UC Berkeley

Robert Bailey, former Director of Admissions and Records at UC Berkeley, explains the importance of accurate record-keeping in education.

Schools are responsible for providing students with an adequate education. However, they must also have excellent record-keeping systems in place. Robert Bailey, former Director of Admissions and Records at UC Berkeley, explains that records must be managed appropriately from creation to disposal. Records are the foundation of operations and school administration, including information about student reports, financial documents, personnel, facilities, school council, and correspondence. 

According to Robert Bailey UC Berkeley, records must be safely stored in a suitable environment with restricted access. Under the Public Records Act of 1973, each record has a life-span depending on the type of information included. Robert Bailey explains that some records are to be destroyed immediately, while others are meant to be kept forever. 

Records are essential to the functionality, efficiency, and legitimacy of a school. Robert Bailey of UC Berkeley explains that people are always allowed access to their records. These documents are often needed when applying for jobs, joining the armed forces, or for citizenship enrollment. Robert Bailey UC Berkeley notes that it is the school’s responsibility to provide the records to ex-students and current students when they request them. 

Employee documents must be stored and maintained over time for both the security of students and for the benefit of the school. Robert Bailey  UC Berkeley explains that personnel files are extremely handy for documenting background checks, complaints, and incidents. According to Robert Bailey of UC Berkeley, records are also used for tracking goals, promotions, and achievement. 

If a previously employed team member wanted to work at the school again, their old file should be used as a reference for rehire eligibility. If they are to be re-employed, the school will continue to use the same file. Robert Bailey of UC Berkeley notes that schools must keep employee files for at least 50 years after their termination date. 

In addition to files about students and staff, schools should maintain records for the campus facilities. Repairs and regular maintenance are essential for keeping a school clean and safe. Like previously mentioned, there may be legislation in place for your school district, which requires records to be kept for a specified period. Robert Bailey UC Berkeley notes that all asbestos-related records must be retained indefinitely, even if an RDA says it can be removed. 

Finally, Robert Bailey of UC Berkeley explains that schools must also keep financial records. Financial records include invoices, statements, and receipts for all operations. Typically, these documents are kept for at least seven years. However, in some instances, it is appropriate to keep them indefinitely. Robert Bailey of UC Berkeley notes that annual financial statements are permanent, and signed off by an auditor before being presented to the school council.

Robert Bailey UC Berkeley

Robert Bailey UC Berkeley Responds to the Corona Virus Outbreak

BERKELEY, CA, USA, June 5, 2020 /– Years in Singapore gives him a unique perspective on the culture surrounding the virus

Robert Bailey UC Berkeley former director of admissions is very familiar with Southeast Asia. Before coming to Berkeley he spent many years traveling in Southeast Asia and had many trips to China.

It is believed the Coronavirus that is currently infesting every nation in the world, began in Wuhan. Robert Bailey UC Berkely believes the popularity of exotic meat in the Wuhan area may have been the breeding ground for the virus.

“It (Coronavirus) was first discovered in a local wholesale food market,” Robert Bailey said.

Wuhan was also the starting point of the SARS epidemic that started in 2003. This was two years after Robert Bailey UC Berkeley had left Singapore to begin working in British Columbia, Canada.

Robert Bailey UC Berkeley has been an administrator all over the world and has long been interested in making college registration efficient and easy for students.

Wuhan is a historic city that has a 350-year-old Guiyuan Temple and a pagoda-like yellow crane tower. But Robert Bailey notes that it is also an important education city as well. It has53 universities, and the largest one, Wuhan University, has 60,000 students.

While the virus has faded some in China, Robert Bailey UC Berkeley is interested in how those universities will make the needed transition to electronic record keeping.

“How does a city that large, and that old, dating back as far as 1460 BC, keep their records, and move them into 2020?” he asks, somewhat rhetorically.
Robert Bailey UC Berkeley’s former registrar would naturally be interested in that question as he has more than 20 years of experience in records management. That experience has involved innovation that has followed Robert Bailey UC Berkeley through the years.

While director of Registration at the University of Oklahoma he identified a single site for registration. Thie eliminated long lines during registration which was the traditional method at the time. In addition, he was able to implement a system that cut grading and reporting time for instructors, which allowed students to get their grades and reports faster.

Robert Bailey UC Berkeley former director was also in Singapore for eight years doing similar work.

“I served as the dean of American College, the vice president for records at Transnational, and as a senior lecturer for Temasek Polytechnic in its information studies program,” said Robert Bailey UC Berkeley former registrar and director of admissions,
While stationed in Singapore he went to 33 countries and made many trips into China, but Robert Bailey UC Berkeley said he does not remember hearing much about the city at that time.

“Now,”  Robert Bailey UC Berkeley former director said, “Wuhan is in the news worldwide; the historical city has become ground zero of the new coronavirus outbreak.”

He would like to go there at some point in the future, and he still has some connections in Singapore that could help him make that happen. Robert Bailey UC Berkeley said he would wait until the medical crisis settles down before making such a trip.

Robert Bailey

Robert Bailey UC Berkeley Reflects on Time Spent Working in Singapore

Former director of admissions Robert Bailey UC Berkeley looks back on his career in the global financial center of Singapore, Southeast Asia.

From the International School of Business and Commerce to a vice-presidential role in records for a leading transnational company, Robert Bailey UC Berkeley has, to date, completed a total of four contracts for a number of prestigious organizations in the Southeast Asian Republic of Singapore. Also teaching and overseeing regular courses centered around records management while based in the global financial center, Robert Bailey UC Berkeley looks back on his years spent working in the island city-state.

Robert Bailey Has More Than 20 Years Experience

“After more than 20 years in records and admissions at the University of California at Berkeley, I accepted the first of four contracts in Singapore, Southeast Asia,” explains former registrar and director of admissions Robert Bailey UC Berkeley. With over two decades of invaluable experience in admissions and records at UC Berkeley, Bailey also boasts a doctorate in administration and a master’s in information technology, according to his resume.

Leaving California for his very first contract in Singapore, Southeast Asia, back in 1992, Robert Bailey UC Berkeley would take up the highly prestigious role of dean of the American College, today more commonly known as the Singapore American School. “Recognized for its largely unparalleled culture of excellence, the college is famed around the world,” reveals Bailey.

Robert Bailey Transitioned Back to Records Management

Remaining in Singapore, Robert Bailey UC Berkeley would later move back into records management, this time in a vice-presidential role in records for a leading transnational company headquartered in the global financial center. “I subsequently returned to my roots, however,” Bailey explains, “next accepting a position at Temasek Polytechnic in Tampines, Singapore.”

An institution of higher learning, Robert Bailey UC Berkeley served as a senior lecturer for a period of time on Temasek Polytechnic’s then-new program centered upon information studies. The institution, he says, remains only the third polytechnic ever to be established anywhere in Singapore.

Robert Bailey UC Berkeley Brings Talents to Singapore

Robert Bailey UC Berkeley‘s fourth and final role to date in Singapore kept the former UC Berkeley registrar and director of admissions in the education sector. “Leaving Temasek Polytechnic, I took a consultancy position offered to me by the International School of Business and Commerce,” adds Bailey, “another prestigious role at a leading organization based in the Southeast Asian republic.”Both in the U.S. and overseas, Robert Bailey UC Berkeley has taught a wide variety of information systems and other courses at the graduate and undergraduate levels alike. “While in Singapore, I also led and oversaw regular seminars, workshops, and other courses,” adds the former UC Berkeley registrar and admissions director, wrapping up, “in fields ranging from records management to marketing and customer service, all of which were extremely well-received by students and attendees across the board.”

Robert Bailey UC Berkeley

Robert Bailey Highlights the Benefits of Online Registration in Universities

Berkeley, CA / April 20, 2020 / In this time of COVID-19 and schools closing temporarily or moving to entirely online classes, the need for paperless systems in universities continues to grow. Robert Bailey UC Berkeley, is a pioneer of online registration, electronic grade submission, and ensuring better admission processes through paperless systems. Online registration allows school procedures to proceed without interruption along with time and cost savings. At the current rate of change, remote options are not only becoming common in universities and workplaces but also preferred.

“Most people would rather log on and register for classes then show up to stand in line early in the morning,” says Robert Bailey UC Berkeley. “All you have to do is see how often students order from GrubHub or Postmates–no one wants to interrupt study or otherwise leave home unless it is absolutely necessary.”

That is often the main benefit of online registration–time.  When he was first designing record systems, Robert Bailey UC Berkeley noticed students often feel pressured to choose classes and produce the correct forms. When they forget a form or do not have a back-up plan when a class fills up, the traditional papered registration system can be unwieldy and overwhelming.

“Online registration eliminates the traditional long lines associated with the start of every semester,” said Robert Bailey UC Berkeley. “Students can take more time choosing classes, including alternatives if a class fills up. It allows for better engagement in education and less frustration.”

It also saves time for college staff. Online registration eliminates the need for sorting forms and entering data. There is not the same time commitment to helping students verify classes and track down forms. In fact, making things easier for registrar offices was a strong motivation in Robert Bailey UC Berkeley decision to create better record management.

“UC Berkeley, like other schools, invests considerable time and money in managing records,” says Robert Bailey UC Berkeley. “When you implement a paperless system, starting with online registration, this becomes much more efficient. You do not waste time searching for lost records and the chance of making errors is low. Online registration is not just about ease for students. It allows for better management systems that also reduces frustration for staff.”

Robert Bailey UC Berkeley noticed considerable cost savings. The traditional registration system often resulted in staff overtime, which is one cost. Better records management reduces that expense. Also, costs decrease mainly due to the lack of paper and printing costs.

“Paper registration existed only because there were no other alternatives,” says Robert Bailey UC Berkeley. “However, once there was an alternative to it, many schools jumped at the opportunity for improved efficiency for lower costs.”

Online registration also addresses another modern problem that is especially considered by the current generation of university-attending students. As pandemics and environmental disasters seem imminent, there is a strong movement to reduce humanity’s impact on the environment. Robert Bailey UC Berkeley noticed this trend as well.

“Students are more aware than ever of the effects of greenhouse gases, dwindling resources, and deforestation,” says Robert Bailey UC Berkeley. “You can see this awareness as recycling spreads and students seek better alternatives to using paper. Implementing online registration is a conservation effort as well and one that is appreciated by this generation.”

Robert Bailey, UC Berkeley

Robert Bailey, UC Berkeley former director of admissions, recalls time working on ‘The Rock’

UC Berkeley former registrar and director of admissions Robert Bailey explains his time working on ‘The Rock’ of the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador.

A former UC Berkeley registrar and director of admissions, Robert Bailey, who’s since traveled across large swathes of the world, looks back on his time spent working on ‘The Rock’ – a well-known island and the most populous part of the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador, off the east coast of North America’s mainland, better recognized by many as Newfoundland.

“When I tell my colleagues that I spent two years on The Rock, unless they’re from Canada, they laugh and ask what I was in prison for,” reveals Bailey, a former director of admissions and registrar at UC Berkeley in California.

Bailey says he then has to explain that he was working for the Newfoundland, Canadian government as a records consultant in the OCIO office. “Actually, just before accepting the job, I’d just finished an across-Canada driving vacation going from Vancouver to Nova Scotia and back,” reveals the former UC Berkeley registrar.

While in Nova Scotia, Robert Bailey decided not to go to Newfoundland because, he says, with the ferry ride, it would take an extra three days. “Then, three months later,” he goes on, “I was, as it would turn out, flying into St. John’s, the capital and largest city of Newfoundland and Labrador, to work in records management.”

Among Bailey’s biggest memories from his time working on Newfoundland island, nicknamed ‘The Rock,’ is the harsh winters. “The winters are extremely harsh and I got used to going to sleep at night to the sound of the snowplows going,” he reveals, “and driving among the native moose – it was one of my best assignments.”

While there, Robert Bailey, UC Berkeley former director of admissions, went to Labrador several times and boated around the floating icebergs, chased whales, and enjoyed, he says, plentiful stream fishing. “Watching the Atlantic puffin birds, too, the work was very interesting, and since the records office was part of the computer systems office, we could easily focus on the transition from paper to electronic records,” adds the former UC Berkeley faculty member.

“When I was there, St. John’s was home to the world’s largest helicopter company,” he goes on, “yet my biggest success personally was working with the Office of Legal Services, which had years of paper records and a young library-trained lady that wanted to bring them into the 20th century.”

Robert Bailey, UC Berkeley former registrar and director of admissions, says that they listened carefully to him, worked hard, and thus were able to reduce the volume of paper records significantly.

“As you boat into St. John’s harbor, the buildings sit on the side of the hill and look very modern and can be seen for miles,” recalls Bailey of arriving on Newfoundland island by sea. “It’s very cutting edge,” he adds, wrapping up, “and if you get a chance to work on The Rock, take it, because it’ll be an experience of a lifetime.”

Robert Bailey

Robert Bailey, former UC Berkeley director of admissions, responds to news of new coronavirus outbreak

Former UC Berkeley director of admissions Robert Bailey remarks on the latest news surrounding China’s human coronavirus outbreak.

 

Living and working in Southeast Asia for many years, and traveling to China on numerous occasions, Robert Bailey, a former UC Berkeley registrar and director of admissions, responds to news of China’s new coronavirus outbreak. Centered on the Hubei province city of Wuhan, it follows the country’s famous SARS epidemic which now took place more than 15 years ago.

 

“The SARS epidemic began in 2003, less than two years after I departed from Singapore to Vancouver, Canada, to accept an adjunct teaching position in the SLAIS program at the University of British Columbia,” explains Bailey. The illness, he reveals, spread to 29 countries, where 8,096 people were infected, and 774 died.

 

“While in Singapore for almost eight years, I served as the dean of American College, the vice president for records at Transnational, and as a senior lecturer for Temasek Polytechnic in its information studies program,” adds former UC Berkeley registrar and director of admissions Bailey.

 

During this time, Bailey traveled to over 30 different countries, including to China on several occasions, yet despite extensive travel in and around Southeast Asia, the former UC Berkeley registrar doesn’t recall hearing anything about Wuhan. “When in Singapore, I traveled to 33 different countries and to China several times, but even with all this time and travel in Southeast Asia, I don’t remember hearing about Wuhan, China,” he explains. 

 

“Now,” Bailey continues, “Wuhan is in the news worldwide; the historical city has become ground zero of the new coronavirus outbreak.” 

 

Robert Bailey, UC Berkeley former registrar and director of admissions, has, he says, since discovered that Wuhan is the world’s largest college town, boasting 53 universities, including Wuhan University that alone accounts for some 60,000 students. Many tourists also visit to see Wuhan University’s scenic East Lake and to enjoy the campus’ cherry blossoms in March and April, according to Bailey. “Other tourists are drawn to Wuhan’s many landmarks, such as the pagoda-like Yellow Crane Tower, the 350-year-old Guiyuan Temple, and the Hubei Provincial Museum,” he adds. 

 

Furthermore, Wuhan is a transportation hub, too, Robert Bailey, UC Berkeley former registrar points out. “The city’s international airport handles more than 24 million passengers annually, and is geographically located in the center of China’s airline route network,” he reveals. 

 

Bailey believes that Wuhan’s traditional love of exotic meats may have started the current coronavirus outbreak. “It was first discovered in a local wholesale food market,” explains the former UC Berkeley registrar. 

 

With a population of over 11 million people, many of whom are currently quarantined, Wuhan has, according to Bailey, in recent years attempted to transition from its reputation as a predominantly traditional place of historical importance to a center for much more high tech endeavors. “Foxconn, a key Apple supplier, has a plant there,” he reveals, “and Renault also has several plants in the area.”

 

With over 20 years of records and information management experience, Robert Bailey says he’ll be interested in Wuhan’s necessary switch from primarily paper to electronic records. “How does a city that large, and that old, dating back as far as 1460 BC, keep their records, and move them into 2020?” he asks, somewhat rhetorically. 

 

Eventually, Bailey says he’ll likely visit Wuhan because of his affiliation with Pacific Region Education Consultancy Pte Ltd in Singapore, which organizes study tours in the area. “I will, however, wait,” he adds, wrapping up, “until the medical crisis settles down.”

Robert Bailey UC Berkeley

Robert Bailey, formerly of UC Berkeley, displays impressive range of professional expertise

Former UC Berkeley registrar and director of admissions Robert Bailey showcases his years of expertise as a professional in records management and elsewhere.

 

From two decades of successful records management experience to supervising teams of more than 250 employees, Robert Bailey, a former UC Berkeley registrar and director of admissions, showcases his impressive range of professional expertise and takes a fond look back on his years of education.

 

“I have over 20 years of successful records management experience,” begins Bailey, a former UC Berkeley registrar and director of admissions. “I’ve developed records programs from the cradle to the grave in numerous settings,” he continues, “and have rolled out four different ECM systems in government and private enterprise.” 

 

Robert Bailey has experience in both international and domestic work and has taught courses both at undergraduate and graduate levels, as well as on a workshop and seminar basis, according to the former UC Berkeley registrar’s impressive background information. “I have both international and domestic work experience,” Bailey reveals, “and have taught information systems courses both at undergraduate and graduate levels, and in workshop and seminar environments.”

 

Bailey, he further goes on to reveal, has represented both vendors and records users as a consultant and employee, and is especially familiar with information governance concepts, strategies, and, in particular, best practices. “I also have a doctorate in administration, a master’s in information technology, and CRM, ECM, and IGP certification,” adds the former UC Berkeley registrar and director of admissions. 

 

Elsewhere, Robert Bailey has both NARA and FEMA certification. “I have both NARA and FEMA essential records certification,” he explains, “and have written extensively on the topic.” 

 

During his decades-long career, Bailey’s work has seen him employ his impressive range of professional expertise in circumstances ranging from one-person departments to supervising teams of more than 250 employees.

 

In addition to showcasing his professional highlights, former UC Berkeley registrar and director of admissions Robert Bailey has also recently spoken at length on topics including his life in Singapore, his time in the U.S. Air Force, and his life-long commitment to Christianity. Last month, Bailey also took a fond look back on his education. “After graduating from the University of Washington in 1961, I ran out of the university’s doors thinking that I was through with going to school,” said Bailey at the time. 

 

While at the University of Washington, Robert Bailey swam for the swim team, was active in student government, and was the president of his fraternity. “After graduation, however, it became apparent that I was far from through with my education,” adds the former UC Berkeley registrar, wrapping up, “following which I went on to further graduate from the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps, attend the Office of Special Investigation school, earn a teaching certificate, complete numerous post-graduate night courses, return to graduate school, finish my second degree, and enroll in the doctorate program.”

Robert Bailey

Robert Bailey, former UC Berkeley registrar and director of admissions, reveals life-long commitment to Christianity

Always a Christian, former UC Berkeley registrar and director of admissions Robert Bailey reveals his life-long commitment to the church.

Former UC Berkeley registrar and director of admissions Robert Bailey, a devoted Christian and churchgoer since childhood, looks back on his life-long commitment to the church, including while serving in the U.S. Air Force and traveling the world.

“At age five, my father took me to Summit Presbyterian Church in Bremerton, Washington,” reveals Bailey, a former UC Berkeley registrar and director of admissions. Later, and while growing up in Bremerton, Robert Bailey also attended, at various times, Charleston Baptist, and a number of other local Presbyterian churches.

“While attending the University of Washington, I attended University Presbyterian and University Congregational churches,” explains former UC Berkeley registrar, Robert Bailey, and director of admissions. He was, he says, also very active in Young Life—which, in more than 70 countries, offers hope with spiritual values to nearly a million teenagers every year—both as an attendee, and, later, as a high school club leader in the Highline School District.

As a member of the U.S. Air Force and assigned to Tinker Air Force Base in Oklahoma, Bailey regularly attended the local base chapel, and, after moving to nearby Norman, attended the city’s Methodist church. “After later accepting a job in Flossmoor, Illinois, my family again attended the local Methodist church, even though my children were Baptist in the University Lutheran Church in Seattle, the same church I was married in,” Bailey explains.

Then accepting another job at the University of California, Berkeley, he attended the Lafayette-Orinda Presbyterian Church in Lafayette, California, where he was an elder. “Following my retirement from both the University of California, Berkeley, and the U.S. Air Force, and accepting work in Singapore, I then attended the First Presbyterian Church,” reveals Bailey.

After meeting his partner, the pair switched to the Methodist Church. “I again supported Young Life in Singapore,” adds former UC Berkeley registrar and director of admissions Bailey. “We then moved to Vancouver, the bustling west coast seaport in British Columbia, Canada, and attended the White Rock Baptist Church and the Steveston United Church,” he goes on to reveal.

Over the coming two and a half decades, the pair enjoyed a variety of jobs, he says, and lived in various towns, attending a range of churches in the process. These, Bailey says, included Southwest Community Church in Palm Springs, First United Methodist Church of San Diego, University Presbyterian Church in Seattle, the Presbyterian Church in Newfoundland, Grace Presbyterian Church in Las Vegas, and, in Washington, D.C., the National Presbyterian Church.

“Currently, I’m back in Singapore,” adds Robert Bailey, wrapping up, “and attending the International Baptist Church here.”

Robert Bailey

Robert Bailey, Former UC Berkeley Registrar and Director of Admissions, Looks Back on Life in Singapore

Former UC Berkeley registrar and director of admissions Robert Bailey looks back on his years working in the global financial center and island city-state of Singapore

Retiring after 20 years in admissions and records at the University of California at Berkeley, Robert Bailey accepted the first of four different contracts in Singapore, Southeast Asia. With a master’s in information technology and a doctorate in administration, former UC Berkeley registrar and director of admissions Bailey, from Lafayette, California, looks back on his time spent in the global financial center and island city-state.

“I accepted the first of four different contracts in Singapore after retiring with 20 years in admissions and records at Berkeley,” explains Bailey.

Robert Bailey first left California for Singapore to serve as the dean of the American College. Now known as Singapore American School, the college is recognized for its unmistakable culture of excellence, extraordinary care, and possibilities, according to the former UC Berkeley registrar and director of admissions. “I later moved into records management as the VP for records at a leading transnational company based in Singapore,” Bailey goes on to explain.

When finished there, the former UC Berkeley registrar and director of admissions went somewhat back to his roots and accepted a position as a senior lecturer at Temanick Polytechnic, an institution of higher learning located in Tampines, Singapore. “Temanick Polytechnic is only the third polytechnic to be established in the island city-state of Singapore,” reveals Bailey, who served at the institution as part of their then-new program in information studies.

Bailey’s fourth role during his life in Singapore remained in the field of education, where he took up a consultancy position offered by what was then the International School of Business and Commerce.

Former UC Berkeley registrar and director of admissions Robert Bailey was based in Singapore from 1992-1998. Singapore, officially the Republic of Singapore, is a sovereign island city-state situated just one degree north of the equator, at the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula. Singapore’s territory is made up of one main island plus a further 62 other islets. Extensive land reclamation completed by the island city-state has increased Singapore’s total size by almost one quarter, equivalent to approximately 130 square kilometers or 50 square miles.

During his decades-long career, Bailey has taught information systems and other courses both at undergraduate and graduate levels, as well as within workshops and seminar settings.

“While living in Singapore, in addition to my roles at the American College, Temanick Polytechnic, the International School of Business and Commerce, and a leading transnational company, I also taught regular workshops, seminars, and courses in records management, marketing, and customer service,” adds former UC Berkeley registrar and director of admissions Robert Bailey, wrapping up.